Inclusiveness Initiative

  • : Function ereg() is deprecated in /home/denverfoundation/public_html/includes/file.inc on line 646.
  • : Function ereg() is deprecated in /home/denverfoundation/public_html/includes/file.inc on line 646.
  • : Function ereg() is deprecated in /home/denverfoundation/public_html/includes/file.inc on line 646.
  • : Function ereg() is deprecated in /home/denverfoundation/public_html/includes/file.inc on line 646.
  • : Function ereg() is deprecated in /home/denverfoundation/public_html/includes/file.inc on line 646.
  • : Function ereg() is deprecated in /home/denverfoundation/public_html/includes/file.inc on line 646.
  • : Function ereg() is deprecated in /home/denverfoundation/public_html/includes/file.inc on line 646.
  • : Function ereg() is deprecated in /home/denverfoundation/public_html/includes/file.inc on line 646.
  • : Function ereg() is deprecated in /home/denverfoundation/public_html/includes/file.inc on line 646.
  • : Function ereg() is deprecated in /home/denverfoundation/public_html/includes/file.inc on line 646.
  • : Function ereg() is deprecated in /home/denverfoundation/public_html/includes/file.inc on line 646.
  • : Function ereg() is deprecated in /home/denverfoundation/public_html/includes/file.inc on line 646.
  • : Function ereg() is deprecated in /home/denverfoundation/public_html/includes/file.inc on line 646.
  • : Function ereg() is deprecated in /home/denverfoundation/public_html/includes/file.inc on line 646.
  • warning: Creating default object from empty value in /home/denverfoundation/public_html/modules/taxonomy/taxonomy.module on line 1419.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/denverfoundation/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/denverfoundation/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/denverfoundation/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/denverfoundation/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/denverfoundation/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/denverfoundation/public_html/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.

Examples of Organizational Cultures Related to Diversity and Inclusiveness

David A. Thomas from the Harvard Business School and Robin J. Ely from Columbia University School of International and Public Affairs have studied organizational culture in relation to diversity and inclusiveness. Their research has uncovered three types of organizational cultures:

Creating a More Inclusive Organizational Culture

Perhaps more than any of the other elements of creating an inclusive organization, changing organizational culture takes time. It is not a linear process that happens overnight. Furthermore, changes to organizational climate can be chaotic. While you can and should develop deliberate strategies to improve organizational culture, some change will naturally occur as a by-product of other activities in your inclusiveness initiative.

Connecting Diversity to Work Perspectives: Integration

 

In this type of organizational culture, people of color are treated with respect, their individual skills and talents are valued and utilized, and their perspectives and assets are incorporated into the fabric of the organization rather than being isolated. Instead of viewing people of color only as connectors to particular constituencies, the organizational culture values and integrates their cultural perspectives and work into the entirety of the organization.

Discrimination-and-Fairness Culture: Assimilation

 

This type of organizational culture is based on the assumption that people are basically all the same and that awareness of differences should be minimized. The goal of diversity or inclusiveness work in organizations with this type of culture is generally to recruit diverse staff and board members, and to ensure that everyone is treated the same way.

Prioritizing Categories

 

It is now time to decide the categories that you will prioritize for your inclusiveness blueprint. Most organizations will choose two to four areas on which to focus their work. For example, an organization may choose to improve its organizational culture so that it is more welcoming of communities of color, to create a more inclusive board of directors, and to find ways to improve their ability to serve communities of color effectively.

Check in on Your Process and Celebrate Your Progress

 

Before continuing, take some time to reflect on the process thus far. Ask yourselves whether your process is working effectively, whether you still have the right people involved in the process, and whether you need to make any process-related course corrections before you begin.

Complete Reviewing Your Process.

Evaluating Success and Soliciting Feedback

It is important that you build methods for evaluating the success of your strategies into any marketing and community relations plan, but it is especially important when you are reaching out to new audiences. There are a number of ways that you can accomplish such evaluation, but the important element is that you create feedback loops that give you honest information about how your audiences are responding to your activities.

Some examples of how to identify whether or not your strategies are achieving their goals include the following:

Defining Objectives

Your objectives help you define success. The best marketing objective is measurable and can be tracked back to the strategy that led to achieving the objective.

However, you will not be able to connect most objectives directly with one specific activity. An objective may be accomplished because of several strategies within your marketing plan, as well as to other outside factors you don't take into account.

Developing Strategies

Tailor marketing and community relations strategies to the needs of your audiences as you have come to understand them. As you gathered information about practices in your field (see Field Facts to Collect) and worked through the process of understanding your audiences (above), you may have identified strategies used by others that you can adapt for your organization.  Note which of these strategies match with your goals and target audiences.

Researching, Identifying, and Understanding Your Audiences

 

Researching your Audiences

As in any marketing process, researching your audiences is the first step. Look for information that describes how you currently reach out to communities of color and identifies potential areas for improvement.

Complete Analyzing Information.